Tag Archives: Bunting

DIY Felt Fall Garland

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

The decorations in my house are constantly changing.

I usually decorate the mantle and a few other parts of the house specifically around the different holidays throughout the year.

I don’t go all out. I usually do something easy and make it a project I can keep from year to year. (I have big tupperware bins labeled by holiday in my basement – therefore each year I have a few more pieces to pull out and it gets easier and easier!)

In fact, this year I only let myself buy one autumn decoration.

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

I bought this pumpkin from Home Goods! For items that are on the larger side, I always go for seasonal – not holiday specific. This pumpkin is about 18 inches tall.

Remember this autumn wreath I made last year?

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

I had some leftover pieces of felt in my craft bin and this idea was brought to life.

Felt Fall Garland:

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

Within an hour I had:

1. Found some leaf and acorn shaped cookie cutters (from the Target dollar bin)

2. Traced on several colored pieces of felt with a fine Sharpie

3. Cut them out and laid them out in the order I wanted them to hang

4. I hand stitched them together with little knots

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

Then I hung it up on my mantle with my trusty blue painters tape. Voila.

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

I think this will transition us from fall to winter – because, yikes, I can’t believe winter is almost here!

For tutorials on the previously mentioned bunting and wreath:

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

Nearly No-Sew Autumn Bunting

DIY Felt Autumn Fall Leaf Garland - DesignLively

DIY Felt Autumn Wreath

Linking up to:
A Marvelous Mess

The Easiest Bunting You’ll Ever Sew.

I mentioned this bunting in my post about the baby shower I hosted at my house a few weeks ago.

If you can sew in a semi-straight line, you can make this bunting.

I started with lots of blue and yellow fabrics from a decorator’s swatch book. (I don’t know where to find these, but I always stumble across them for free. Just a few weeks about a picked up several outside an Interior Decorator’s office for free!)

These squares could be easily replicated with a pair of pinking shears (available at any craft store). I folded about 2″ backwards and ironed it flat.

I did this to all my squares (13 squares gave me a bunting about 5′ long). Then I put them in the order that I wanted them to hang – separating stripes and plaids and spreading out the dark and light fabrics.

Then I sewed them together. In one continuous line.

I just kept feeding another square into the machine and added it to the string. Does that make sense?

To attach it to the mantle I used 2 big pieces of painter’s tape (my little secret) and I was done!

I told you.

It’s the easiest bunting possible!

(And PS – this baby boy the shower was for made his grand appearance last night! Hoorah!)

Nearly No-Sew Autumn Bunting

This project begins like many others in my house. With two little words: Trash. Picking.

There is an interior designer who lives down the street from my parents. Every once in a while she weeds through her stash and puts lots of lovely items she doesn’t need anymore on the curb. In the case of this project, she was getting rid of a swatch book of designer fabrics. I’ve been saving them for eons and the right project finally came long.

I thumbed through it and cut out all the swatches that looks warm, cozy and all-things-autumn.

First, I folded them in half an cut them into rough triangles. Then I ironed them flat.

Then I folded over one “hem” by about 1/4 inch and ironed it down. Then I used dabs of hot glue to “hem” the first side of the triangle.

I let them dry for a few minutes and then I ironed the opposite sides of the triangles. You will want to take care not to press the iron on the hot-glued-hem, as the heat will cause the hot-glue to liquefy again.

When ironing the second side, be sure to create a nice point at the bottom of the triangle. You may need to trim the fabrics slightly to allow for this.

After I ironed down my hems of the second side, I dabbed them with hot glue to make them stay.

After they all had time to harden, I trimmed the corners of the topside. Since I would be hemming this side as well, I didn’t want the corners to peek out the sides. After I cut the corners off, I ironed and hot glued just like before.

Then I ironed each flag flat.

IMPORTANT: Be sure to iron in-between two pieces of fabrics. Otherwise you will get hot glue all over your iron face. Also don’t iron for too long or the hot glue will seep through the front of the flag.

Next I took all my flags and arranged them in the order I wanted them to hang – alternating the plaids, golds, reds and blues. I piled them in order and started to “sew”.

This could hardly be called sewing. If you can thread a needle you can do this part. I overlapped the corners and made a quick loop (by hand) and tied the knot in the back.

Once they were all connected I taped them up with painter’s tape (as to not ruin our freshly painted walls!).

I think it’s sweet. : )

Total Cost: FREE
Total Time: About 2 hours

Now I just need to pretend we have cabinet doors back on the cabinet bases (yep! my living room cabinet doors are also in the abyss of my basement) and get some window treatments up in here.

I already have my swatches picked out for my Christmas one! I can’t wait to make it. Perhaps next time I shall try sewing it.

DIY Wedding Buntings and Thank You Signs

Continuing with my August theme of wedding-related DIY projects (in honor of our anniversary) today I’m sharing my decorative wedding buntings and thank you signs.

Buntings are all over the place these days! For our wedding I chose to do square buntings to cut down on time. Cutting squares will always be faster than cutting circles. Also, I could fit more on to one page.

I used Adobe Illustrator and InDesign for all my projects, although I don’t see why you couldn’t do this in PowerPoint or Word.

I cut out each letter and mounted it on a square of blue cardstock.

(This step isn’t necessary, but I wanted to add more weight to the letters to they wouldn’t flip around in the breeze.)

Lastly, I laid out a long spool of ribbon and hot glued the letters, leaving room for the ends to tie.

I knew I wanted to personalize our thank you notes. We had so many people to thank!

I made these “thank you wands”, as I called them, in Adobe Illustrator. I spray mounted them to foam core with 3M Super77 and cut them out with a razor blade. Then I glued them to two kabob sticks (which were glued together for strength) and added ribbon.

(In hindsight, I would not have done the scalloped edges. Cutting that out took ages, although I was happy with the result.)

For our cards, I purchased Mohawk plain, white cardstock photo frame cards and matching envelopes from Dick Blick Art Supplies and ordered the photos from Shutterfly for 10 cents each. Doing it this was was MUCH less of a cost than ordering custom greeting cards from an online source like Shutterfly or Snapfish.

In hindsight, I should have ordered address labels too. But I didn’t. My fingers still hurt. ; )