Tag Archives: backroom

Paint Me a Family Room

DesignLively - our DIY renovation

I think I’ve mopped 20 times in the last week.

And written “wash me” in the construction dust covering the first floor of our house.

And even though my house has pretty much looked like these for the past two weeks:

DesignLively - our DIY renovation

It’s totally worth it because it’s coming together!

By the way, if you look closely at the photo above (beyond the sea of tarps and dust) you will see we expanded the doorway into the living room by 14 inches!

DesignLively - our DIY renovation

On my last post about this room (we’re having trouble “renaming” this room – the family room? the back room? the den?) I posted some crummy iPhone pictures I took at 9pm at night.

Now you can really see we have new walls! And new windows! And new trim!

This room has a whopping 9 windows, so there was lots… of… trim… to paint around.

DesignLively - our DIY renovation

First I painted one quick layer of paint on the wall – we decided to continue with Valspar’s Shoreline Haze, which is in our living room.

My friend Alli always makes fun of me because I need at least two words to describe a color. This room is a putty oatmeal.

DesignLively - our DIY renovation

Then we spent a while going through the room filling nail holes with spackle and sanding them down.

And then we used caulking to fill all the spaces between the trim and the walls.

DesignLively - our DIY renovation

Then I taped off the windows and painted the raw areas with Killz. Twice. No bleed-through!

Then I gave the entire room and all the trim two coats of paint.

And somewhere along the way we added baseboards.

DesignLively - our DIY renovation

Lo and behold, we’re actually looking at furniture for this room right now, so hopefully soon enough I’ll be relaxing with my feet up in this room!

My nice, clean, dusted off feet that is.

: p

Tips on a DIY Whitewashed Brick Wall

I’m no sure if it’s more appropriate to call this project “whitewashing” or “faux painting”, because it certainly involved a bit of each.

In my research, all the “whitewashing brick” tutorials featured porous, red brick – not my flat-slabbed industrial, gray brick we found on the backside of our fireplace.

Tips on a DIY Whitewashed Brick Wall

So I turned to my long-standing sound credo, let’s just wing it.

Tips on a DIY Whitewashed Brick Wall

1. White Base

I started with a VERY watered-down paint – about 5-8 parts water to one part white latex paint. Stir thoroughly.

I used a fat brush to apply, and old rags to wipe around the excess – I found wiping was better than dabbing, which left a weird texture.

Tips on a DIY Whitewashed Brick Wall

Most tutorials I read used a 2:1 water to paint ratio. But, since our brick was not very porous I was worried about it just looked straight-up painted. (Not the look we were going for.) You can always add more paint people!

Tips on a DIY Whitewashed Brick Wall

2. Depth and Variation

Because our brick wall was straight gray, I wanted to add some variation. I made a few different colors of gray paint, using a bit of black paint. I painted specific bricks a different color gray – emphasizing darkness in certain corners of the brick to create shading.

I also used some bright white paint to highlight corners of some bricks to help with this.

Tips on a DIY Whitewashed Brick Wall

3. The Grout

You will need to decide what color you would like your grout to end up being. We liked the look of a whiter-grout, so I took a small paintbrush and used the same step 1 treatment on all of the grout.

Tips on a DIY Whitewashed Brick Wall

4. Final Layer

To bring together all of the different gray and white bricks, I added a little bit more white paint to my original watered down mixture. I went over the entire wall three times, wiping down each layer.

Tips:

1. This was SUPER drippy. I had no interest in protecting our floor, since we are building right over it – but you should probably protect yours.

2. You can’t go wrong. When in doubt, dab, wipe, repeat.

3. Your arm should be moving CONSTANTLY. Otherwise your wall will just look drippy when the paint collects.

4. Layers. Layers. Layers. I probably did each step 3-4 times before moving on to the next step.

5. Back AWAY from the wall. Every few minutes, walk 10-15 feet away from the wall and see how it looks to ensure consistency.

6. Daylight. I paint at night all the time, but this project is definitely one you need daylight for. Harsh work lights will cast an uneven glare.

Now that we’ve started painting the room, I might do another layer to tint it. If I do I will sure let you know. : )