Category Archives: Get Crafty

Seeking Steamer Trunk Restoration Tips

All right, I am posting this bad boy for some project accountability.

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This fantastic steamer trunk belonged to my Granna. There is even a shipping label on the side in her handwriting when she sent her things to college! I love it and I can’t wait to refinish it.

The only thing is… I got it about six months ago and it’s been waiting in my basement for some attention ever since.

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Like many steamer trunks, it’s looking a little worse for the wear.

Dirty, scuff marks, broken handles, chewed up edges, and scratches.

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And the inside, oh heavens, the inside smells like moth balls are invading your brain. I can’t leave it open for more than a minute or you can smell it from across the room.

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Because of the odor the inside will definitely need to be stripped as well.

But I am looking forward to starting this labor of love! I am posting these “before” shots so I will feel pressured to finally make a crack at beginning it.

The only question is how. I’ll begin scouring the internet for tips, and if any of you have experience in this area please share your wisdom!

Have you restored a steamer trunk? Any tips? Suggestions?

How to Make Swirly Paper Snowflakes

How to Make Swirly Paper Snowflakes

A few days ago I shared my Christmas decor for this year. (Yahoo!) I expect this is the last you will hear from me for the next week, as I will be fully enjoying holiday festivities, family, friends, and checking-out of the world! (Another Yahoo!)

But first! I said I’d share how I made my swirly snowflakes that are hanging in my windows.

I decided to make swirly snowflakes this year instead of the traditional cut-out snowflakes for a change of pace – and I love them! Plus, they are super easy to make, and there’s no million little pieces to pick up.

To make one snowflake you will need:

– 6 pieces of printer paper
– Scissors
– Scotch tape

How to Make Swirly Paper Snowflakes

How to make a swirly paper snowflake:

1. Fold the paper corner to corner and cut off the excess to make a square piece of paper.

2. With the paper still folded, about 1″ from the edge, cut a straight line (starting at the folded side) and stop 1″ from the center of the triangle. Repeat until you have 6-8 cuts (an even number). I like to cut a full triangle at the very end.

3. Unfold your square. Starting in the middle, bring together the first two newly-cut corners and tape.

4. Repeat, going every other set of corners. Then turn the square over and repeat.

5. Now you will have 1 section of the snowflake.

How to Make Swirly Paper Snowflakes

5. Make 5 more sections, and then tape them together at the center and on the sides.

6. Voila!

P.S. Like my new rug?

How to Make Swirly Paper Snowflakes

Last step? Tape up anywhere and enjoy!

I wish you all a Merry Christmas and I will see you all sometime next year!

Easy DIY Cone Christmas Tree

Easy DIY Cone Christmas Tree - DesignLively

About once a month my friend hosts a girls craft night at her house. Little does she know I’ve been trying to carve out some more time for keeping crafty (i.e. not spackling walls, sanding down dressers, or painting crown molding) so it’s been a great excuse for me to get back into it. Plus, crafting with friends is more fun.

This month we made Christmas trees from cardboard cones! We all ended up giving our projects a different treatment – and I chose white felt for a snowy tree look that I can use all season long.

1. Start with a fiberboard cone (you can get 3 for $10 here). Styrofoam cones would also work. I picked up the white felt from Michael’s for $0.33 a sheet. I ended up using 4 sheets – which makes this an easy $12 project.

2. Paint your cone white. I used an acrylic craft paint.

Easy DIY Cone Christmas Tree - DesignLively

Note: If you are DIY renovating your home you will never have nice nails. Ever.
This is the best I can do.

3. While the paint dries, cut out long half-circles from the felt like a mad woman. I used my thumb as a template for the size of the long half-circles as I cut (from knuckle to nail, about 1″ wide).

4. Get out your glue gun and go to town. Start at the bottom and work your way up, layering your half-circles to completely cover up the cone underneath.

Easy DIY Cone Christmas Tree - DesignLively

If desired, there are plenty of ways to make this project more Christmas-y (add pom-pom ornaments, use green felt, or (for the daring) glitter!). Like most Christmas decorations I have, I opted to keep this wintery-simple so I can keep it them out all season long.

For now the trees are living in my kitchen, where I have ferociously spent all weekend making Christmas candies as gifts to thank some of the many people who have been such a help to us this year both at work and with our ongoing renovations. We couldn’t do it without them!

How are you getting ready for Christmas? Our tree is up and ready to be enjoyed! Which is where I am off to now : )

DIY Fabric Boot Stuffers

diy-boot-stuffers-2

You know you live in New England when you look forward to boot season  more than flip-flop season. I love boots. They are my soul/sole footwear of choice.

Unfortunately, boots, when stored improperly, flop. This causes the material around the ankles to sink/wrinkle/crease/crack over time. Some people have boot hangers,  but who has the hanging space for four pairs of boots? Not me. I have used the plastic boot shapers for years, and I hate them. They are a pain to put in the boot (especially boots without zippers), so I chucked them all. When I saw fabric boot shapers at T.J. Maxx a while back, a bell went off in my head. I could make those!

diy-boot-stuffers

Materials Needed: (the quantities below will be enough to make 4 boot stuffers)

  • 1 yard fabric (I used a 100% cotton batik)
  • 1 lb bag of polyester stuffing
  • 64″ yarn ( four 16″ pieces)
  • 12″ ribbon

1. Cut fabric to four 14″x19″ rectangles. If you have wide-calf boots you may want to go up to 16″x19″ (or just measure your leg where the top of the boot hits your calf).

2. Take 16″ of yarn and lay over the shorter side (14″) of the fabric. Let yarn overhang edges by 1″ on each side. (This is the easiest way I could come up with to cinch the fabric closed).

3. Fold over the short end by 1″ with the yarn tucked inside. Sew a straight line across.

4. Cut 3″ of ribbon and fold in half (pretty side out).  Repeat step 3 for the other short end, but half-way through lay down the folded ribbon and include in sewing line. This isn’t necessary but added a cute little loop to pull your boot stuffers by.

5. Next fold the rectangle in half long-ways with the ugly side out. Sew a line straight down to create a tube. Start and stop sewing your line before you get to the part that is folded over – both an inch from the edge.

6. Turn tube inside out. Cinch one end of the tube with yarn and tie tightly. Stuff until full and cinch and tie tightly. Snip extra yarn off.

Voila! I happened to have all these materials in my craft closet, so this project cost me $0.00! But if you were to go to the store you could easily get all these materials for $10.00 – bringing this project down to $2.50 a boot stuffer, or $5.00 for a pair of boots.

It may even make a nice DIY Christmas gift for the boot-lover on your list!